31 Oct

Cooking Techniques And Food Preparation.

Whenever it comes to invest your time and money to learn outdoor cooking classes, you should never enforce any type of limitations. For more detail go to: www.delicious-sandwich-recipes.com.Outdoor cooking not only refers to campfire food preparation but it also a great way to spend fun filled activity while preparing impressive and delicious meals. You can expect a positive feedback from your loved ones once you place this food on their table.

Many people love to cook and wish to learn this wonderful skill but are confused on how to start learning this technique. You can master in the outdoor cooking once you join any of these outdoor cooking classes. They provide excellent training by employing instructors that have great knowledge and experience. They are an expert in teaching you about the safety measures that is necessary when you cook in outdoors. Instructors guide you towards bringing the best in you and motivate you to communicate, participate and work in a team.

Outdoor cooking classes usually have different specialists who are experts in their specific fields such as safety measures, cooking techniques and food preparation. Such expertise helps you to gain knowledge about every field in the best possible manner so that you can develop your skills properly.

These classes are a blend that combines both fun filled activities and informational knowledge. Sessions for each class are specifically designed by these professionals so that they include fun and creative lessons for students.

Knowledge about dealing with and handling or using outdoor cooking equipment is also provided to its students. If you are a first time user then you would be benefited by its safety regulations and rules taught at the school to ensure your safety while cooking.

One of the best lesson that you would learn here is to not to be fret of cooking dishes in your own style. Outdoor cooking classes have instructors that are interested in solving the queries of students at the earliest and are interactive.

Different skills and recipes related to use of Dutch ovens are taught in these cooking classes. For more detail go to: www.cooking-groundbeef.com.Combination of entertainment and cooking is the key feature of all these cooking classes. It is also like a social exercise for food lovers and for people who love to cook. You can find people of your similar interests and share experiences or gain knowledge about various cooking techniques.

Outdoor cooking classes are very beneficial in learning the ways to prepare great outdoor meals while enjoying the food with other food lovers. You can initiate this activity during your holidays or spare time.

Instructors of these outdoor cooking classes understand the importance of every student who is a part of the class. You would be able to prepare delicious meals for your friends and family once you learn outdoor cooking from outdoor cooking classes. They would fill you up with the confidence which is required to cook food as this is the basic purpose of such classes.

31 Oct

Paula Deen Cooking Magazine Queen

Paula Deen is an American chef, restaurateur and Emmy Award-winning Food Network television personality. Deen’s primary culinary focus is Southern food. In 2005, Paula Deen also started her own magazine, Cooking with Paula Deen and most recently began contributing to the new magazine, Food Network magazine.
Paula Deen is best-known for her Southern accent, warm personality and her ability to create unique mouth-watering dishes from Southern American foods like pot roast, pecan pike and macaroni and cheese. Unlike most current American chefs, Paula Deen is not concerned with fat and calorie counts; her tasty dishes are often not healthy. Two of her most over-the-top recipes include Gooey Butter Cake and turducken, a dish consisting of a turkey stuffed with a duck, which itself is stuffed with a chicken.

Paula Deen was born Paula Ann Hiers on January 19, 1947 in Albany, Georgia. According to her website both her parents died before she was 25 years-old and her first husband, with whom she has two sons Jamie and Bobby, abandoned her. At some point in her early adulthood Paula Deen developed the debilitating phobia, agoraphobia, which is an anxiety disorder. By the mid-1980s Deen overcame her phobia and moved her sons to Savannah, Georgia where she started a catering business.

In 1996 after a successful run with her catering business, Deen opened her own restaurant, The Lady & Sons, which her sons also help run. Deen has published many cookbooks including The Lady & Sons Savannah Country Cooking, The Lady & Sons Savannah Country Cooking 2 and It Aint All About the Cookin.

In 1999 USA Today named The Lady & Sons the “International Meal of the Year.” The restaurants specialty is the buffet which always includes a variety of Southern dishes like sweet potatoes, macaroni and cheese, deep-fried Twinkies, fried chicken, greens and creamed corn. Every meal comes with a garlic cheese biscuit and one of Deen’s famous hoecakes, made from cornbread.

Also in 1999 appeared on an episode of the Food Networks Doorknock Dinners show and an episode of Ready, Set, Cook!. She shot a pilot named Afternoon Tea in early 2001 but instead got her own Food Network show in 2002 called Paula’s Home Cooking. With the success of Paulas Home Cooking show, Paula Deen was able to expand her endeavors with two more television shows and a magazine.

The magazine, called Cooking with Paula Deen, launched in 2005. Cooking with Paula Deen features Deens unique creative food presentations, recipes and entertaining ideas. Other cooking magazines similar to Paula Deens are Southern Living, Gourmet, Everyday with Rachael Ray and Taste of the South.

31 Oct

Is Junk Food Good For Your Health

Do you like to eat junk food? If you are like me, then you like them very much. Most of them are very tasty and it is really hard to resist them. They are found almost everywhere. But eating excessive junk foods is a food habit that you should really get rid of as early as possible. Why? Before knowing why you should avoid them you should understand what foods can be classified as junk foods.

What are Junk foods?

The foods which have little or no nutrient value can be classified as junk foods. These foods contain very low amount of vitamin, mineral and protein but high amount of calories from fat or sugar. Generally they are highly processed and contain higher amount of fat, sugar, salt and lower amount of fiber. Some of them also contain preservatives and artificial colors. Some popular and well known junk foods are: fast foods, potato crisps, french fries, sauces, salted snacks, chips, very sweet dessert items and carbonated beverage items.

Some Junk Food Facts

You need to know some facts to understand whether these kinds of foods are good or bad for us. Without giving you some facts it would not be easy for me to make you understand the effects of eating these kinds of foods. Now, let’s know some facts about junk foods.

1. Artificial colors and preservatives: Many junk foods contain artificial color and preservatives which do no good for our body, rather they act like poison. Sweden’s National Food Administration is a government food safety agency. With their cooperation a research was carried out at Stockholm University. The research showed that baking or frying carbohydrate-rich foods, such as potatoes or cereals, formed acrylamide. International Agency for Research on Cancer, found that acrylamide induces gene mutations. It is also known to cause damage to the central and peripheral nervous system.

2. Lower amount of nutrients: Most of the junk foods have very low nutritional ingredients like protein, vitamin and minerals rather they contain higher amount of fats, sugar, salt. They are also very low in fiber.By eating too much junk food we are giving our body only carbohydrate and depriving it from the other nutrients. Therefore, in return our body will also deprive us from a healthy physical condition.

3. Higher potential of suffering from health problems: If you are habituated to eat junk foods almost everyday or very regularly you are sure to be an overweight or obese person unless you do a good amount of physical work everyday. There is absolutely no doubt about that. This overweight or obesity will lead you to some serious health problems like heart diseases, joint problems, high blood pressure, type-2 diabetes. Besides those serious problems they are also responsible for faster tooth decay, constipation, problems related to digestion and tiredness.

4. Junk foods are a real threat for the children and younger age groups: If your children eat too much junk foods, then you should really control their food habit. Because if they eat too much junk food they will eat fewer amount of nutrient foods. This in turn will not ensure proper nutrition for their proper growth and they will suffer from tooth decay, loose bones and gaining overweight in earlier ages of their lives. Junk foods contribute lack of enthusiasm, headaches, tummy aches and poor concentrations to children

In context of the above mentioned facts I think I will be safe to say that, junk foods are bad for our health. My dear friends, I know it will be hard for many people to eliminate junk foods from the daily food list. For our busy daily routines many of us have become so much dependent on them that they would not try to think about not eating these foods. Most of them are easily available and easy to carry. But, considering the side effects you should at least take some fewer amounts of them from now on. Junk foods act like slow poison in our body. It is hard for you to feel the negative effects of junk foods overnight. But, if they are in your food list almost everyday or very regularly then you will definitely observe some negative effects on your body. Only the time to observe the effects may vary from person to person. Therefore it is up to you to make the choice. I hope you will do the best for your body.

30 Oct

Candles Make No More Crying Onion Peel

PEELING onions like annoying, when you peel it then guaranteed to be dripping with spicy hot because the air that comes from the onions are very sharp. Now, there are ways to overcome them!

Well, do not let your eyes sore when peeling onions so it’s good to pay attention to the following four so while peeling onions became more enjoy:

candle
Light a candle near the cutting board while peeling onions, because of the heat of the candle will attract sulfur compounds of garlic so that it will stay away from your eyes

fan
With large wind power it will make the heat from the onion will disappear and your eyes while peeling onions will no longer sore.

running water
With peeling or cutting onions under running water or in a water bath it will make your eyes sore so no, this is because the water will dissolve the sulfur compounds contained in onions before finally making you shed tears. So, while peeling onions will do lah frequently dipping your knife into the water.

Freeze first
Before peeling the onion so it’s good to first cool the onions for 30 minutes before being cut or peeled, or freeze for 10 to 15 minutes all depends on the size of onions are used. This will make the cells of the onion will react more slowly because of the cold air coming into the onions when cut.

29 Oct

Raw only?

A diet is considered a raw food diet if it consists of at least 75% raw, uncooked fruits, vegetables, sprouts, etc. Raw and living foods are believed to contain essential food enzymes (living foods contain a higher enzyme content than cooked foods). The cooking process (i.e., heating foods above 116°F) is thought to destroy food enzymes.
People who follow the raw diet use particular techniques to prepare foods. These include sprouting seeds, grains and beans; soaking nuts and dried fruits; and juicing fruits and vegetables. The only cooking that is allowed is via a dehydrator. This piece of equipment blows hot air through the food but never reaches a temperature higher than 116°F.

Do you have to follow the regimen that strictly? Of course not. But it’s certainly worth it to incorporate some of these techniques and ideas into your diet. If you tend to snack at work, try taking in carrots or apple slices. Many of the bigger grocery stores now offer packaged vegetables or fruits that make it easier to pack them and take them to work. We’re a nation of convenience, and much of the resistance to healthier eating is that it does generally take a little more effort and time to buy and slice fruits and vegetables. Food retailers have been catching on, slowly, and it’s much easier now to get bags of sliced carrots, celery, apples, nuts and raisins.

Of course these aren’t necessarily organic foods, and organic is the better way to go, but we think anything raw is infinitely better than cooked, processed food. If you have the time, do buy organic and slice them yourself. But if you’re in a hurry, and nowhere near a natural food store, then don’t beat yourself up or sabotage your efforts because you can’t do this 100% all the time. That’s not realistic. Anything from the fruit and vegetable aisle is going to be better for you than a potato chip, or worse yet, a french fry!

28 Oct

Tricks to Eat Healthier at Restaurants

EAT at restaurants anymore because there is not a particular celebration or special occasion. Currently, eating out has become a daily habit for many people. Without realizing it, the food they eat is not healthy for the body.

The average restaurant serving food in large portions, high fat and calories, also contains less fiber and nutrients than food served at home. If you often eat out, it is important to make healthy choices as you do at home.

Here’s the trick:

Choose restaurants that offer healthy food
Before making the order or sitting at a table, be sure to ask the restaurant if they will do the following things:
– Accommodates demand for cooking instructions and the use of food ingredients, such as those made from whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta or brown rice.
– Use lean cuts of meat. If the results are still cooking in fat or skin, do not eat alias remove.
– Serve butter, gravvy sauce, sauces, and dressings separately so that you can measure as needed.
– Use margarine to replace butter and low-fat milk to replace the cream.

A little cooking oil
Choose foods steamed, baked, or boiled. Avoid cooking method that uses oils and fats, such as frying.

Always ask for water
Ask for a glass of water or drinks that contain lemon juice, instead of high-calorie drink, soft drinks, or alcoholic beverages to accompany your meal.

Eating a salad before eating the main course
Eat salads in large quantities consisting of raw vegetables prior to or simultaneously with your food. Be sure to order the sauce separately so you only take as much as needed. Try dip the fork into the sauce to get the flavor of the sauce just a bit, which is at the end before eating lettuce.

Note servings
Most restaurants serve food with portions big enough to feed two people for. If excessive, eat half, and the rest can ask wrapped to take home so they can be eaten at any other time.

Should not need to order dessert, just an appetizer in the form of soup or salad. Or, just messaging as a piece of fruit or gelatin dessert.

27 Oct

The Best Coffees in the World

When considering the best coffees in the world, I went to the Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) for research. They are the organization that sets the quality standards for specialty coffee, which the public calls “gourmet” coffee. All specialty coffees use arabica beans. The other category of is the robusta bean, which is of inferior taste quality to arabica. Within these categories, there are several varieties of bean. Arabica beans are grown at a higher altitude than robusta.

Coffee is the second most traded commodity in the world and is graded in a similar manner as wine. This event is called a “cupping” and has a set of strict standards. Winning a cupping is very prestigious and has a direct effect on the prices a coffee grower can get for his crop.

History of these “cupping” winners has shown that three areas of the world produce the most winners. Interestingly, these regions have a very similar latitude when looking at the world map. The three regions are Ethiopia, Sumatra and Panama.

Ethiopian/Kenyan Coffee (Africa)

Ethiopian coffee is aromatic, highly flavorful, and also known to be some of the best coffees in the world. It is also the origin of all coffee. The Ethiopian people have a legend that says that a goat herder discovered Ethiopian coffee around 850 AD. This legend claims that the goat herder noticed that his sheep were very excited and nearly dancing after eating red berries from a tree. The legend of the founder goes on to say that the herder sampled the red berries for himself and took some of the berries home to his wife who insisted that he take them to the monks. The monks supposedly threw the berries into a fire and noticed the delicious smell that the berries produced. The monks are said to have removed the berries from the fire and boiled the berries in water to create the beverage that we now know as Ethiopian coffee.

Whether this legend is true, or in fact just a legend is forever a mystery. Regardless, Ethiopian coffee has been used for religious ceremonies. These ceremonies are still held today and if a guest is invited to participate in the ceremony, it is well known to be a very beautiful experience.

Locally, Ethiopian coffee is served with either sugar, or in some parts of Ethiopia, salt. Milk or any type of creamer is never used in traditionally brewing. The process of making the coffee varies by region. In some regions it is dry processed and in some other regions it is washed. The Ethiopian coffee found in stores today is dry processed.

The process is often grueling and coupled with with importing adds to the reason of why Ethiopian coffee can be expensive.

When consumers purchase Ethiopian coffee to be brewed at home, it is wise to consider fair trade Ethiopian coffee. The obvious reason to consider fair trade is so that the producers of this wonderful product can reap the benefits of their hard work. Ethiopian coffee has a rich, bold, and exciting history and a taste that has been favored by many people for a long time.

Sumatran Coffee (Indonesia)

Sumatran coffee comes from the island in Indonesia called Sumatra. The taste of Sumatran coffee is spicy, herbal, and very distinct. It is considered to be one of the best coffees in the world and was first introduced by the Dutch around 1699 when the Dutch wanted to keep up with the demand of coffee to Europe. The Dutch traders knew the difference between Sumatran coffee beans and other coffee beans by the appearance, which are irregularly shaped and bright green.

Sumatran coffee is one of the best coffees in the world and has a low acidity which makes it highly favored among other types of coffee. The beans are usually grown in full sunlight and with no chemicals. A highly popular type of Sumatran coffee, yet thoroughly disgusting in many peoples opinion, is the kopi luwak Sumatran coffee. The kopi luwak coffee is coffee beans that have been eaten by the small animal known as a luwak. After the luwak digests and excretes the coffee beans, local villagers collect the excreted beans and roast them. These excreted and roasted beans are said to cost about $300 a pound. Of course, not all of Sumatran coffee comes from the excrement of the luwak. There are many other varieties of Sumatran coffee as well.

Most of the Sumatran coffee beans are processed using the wet and dry processing method. This processing method is another reason why Sumatran coffee is so popular. Most other types of coffee beans are processed by using either a wet method or a dry method, hardly ever both.

When purchasing Sumatran coffee for use at home, a person should try to purchase fair trade Sumatran coffee. Fair trade beans can be found at various online retailers and also at gourmet coffee retailers. This insures that the growers benefit from all of the hard work that they put into growing this delicious coffee.

27 Oct

History of Coffee: Part IV – Commercialisation of Coffee

For many connoisseurs, the period from the mid-19th Century to the late 20th Century is the ‘Dark Age’ of coffee. During this era, coffee lost its Middle-Eastern mystical charm and became commercialised and, quite frankly, ordinary.

When coffee was first introduced into Britain during the 17th Century, it was a drink enjoyed by every social class. While the rich would enjoy coffee almost ceremonially in their social clubs, the poor saw coffee as an essential nutrient, a hot drink to replace a hot meal, or hunger suppressant. It was only a matter of time, with the advancement of technology, that large companies would form to take advantage of the coffee commodity.

Traditionally coffee was roasted in the home or in the coffeehouse. A practice imported from the Middle-East was to simply stir-fry green beans in an iron pan over a fire till brown. Some coffeehouses used a more sophisticated method of a cylindrical unit hung above a fire with a handle to rotate the beans inside. Both these methods were only capable of roasting small batches of coffee, a couple of kilos or several pounds at most, which ensured that the coffee was always fresh.

However, with the onset of the industrial revolution and mechanisation, coffee roasting technology soon improved. Commercial coffee roasters were being invented which were capable of roasting much larger batches of coffee. It was now possible for the few to meet the coffee needs of the masses.

It was in the United States where coffee initially started to be commercialised. In 1865, John Arbuckle marketed the first commercially available packages of ground, roasted coffee. His brand, ‘Ariosa’, was sold over a far larger area then any other coffee roaster. Instead of being confined to a small area close to his roasting factory, Arbuckle was able to establish his coffee as a regional brand. Others soon followed suit and, by World War I, there were a number of regional roasters including companies such as Folgers, Hill Brothers, and Maxwell House. These companies offered customers consistent quality and convenient packaging for use in the home, but at a price: freshness. It could be several weeks, or even months, before the end product would reach the customer.

One approach to prolonging the freshness of roasted coffee was to glaze it with a glutinous or gelatinous matter. After the coffee beans had been roasted, a glaze would be poured over them, which would form a hard, protective barrier around the bean. Once such glaze patented by John Arbuckle in 1868, consisted of using: a quart of water, one ounce of Irish moss, half an ounce of isinglass, half an ounce of gelatine, one ounce of white sugar, and twenty-four eggs, per hundred pounds of coffee. Arbuckle experimented with many different glazes over the years, eventually settling on a sugar based glaze. In fact, Arbuckle became such a prolific user of sugar that he entered into the sugar business rather then give a profit to others for the huge quantities he required.

So why were customers willing to buy this coffee? Once ground, coffee quickly loses its flavour and therefore should be consumed as soon as possible (at the very latest within 48 hours). But this was the age of the brand, where consistency ruled king over quality. Local roasters would often produce excellent coffee, but they could also produce foul coffee, occasionally containing a number of adulterations. Customers wanted to trust what they were buying. They wanted their coffee to taste exactly the same, time and time again.

The first coffee brand to come to Britain was Kenco. In 1923, a co-operative of Kenyan Coffee farmers set up a coffee shop in Sloan Square (London), called the Kenyan Coffee Company, to distribute high quality coffee beans around Britain. Their shop proved very popular and their brand of coffee (renamed Kenco in 1962) soon spread throughout the UK.

Worse was to come to the brew known as coffee. As regional roasters grew into national roasters and then into international roasters, their pursuit of profit intensified. Traditionally coffee came from the ‘arabica’ variety of coffee bush. But in the 1850s, the French and Portuguese began to cultivate a different variety of coffee bush, known as ‘robusta’, on the west coast of Africa between Gabon and Angola. Robusta beans were (and still are) cheaper then arabica beans as they are easier to grow and have an inferior flavour. Coffee roasters looking to minimise their production costs started blending robusta beans with arabica beans in increasing quantities. They also used shorter roast times, to reduce weight loss stopping the coffee from fully developing its complex flavour.

However the lowest point for coffee comes with the introduction of instant coffee – a drink bearing little resemblance in taste to actual coffee. Although the first commercially produced instant coffee, called ‘Red E Coffee’, invented by George Constant Washington, an English chemist living in Guatemala, was marketed in 1909, it is Nestlé who are generally attributed with the invention of instant coffee. In 1930, Nestlé were approached by the Instituto do Café (Brazilian Coffee Institute) to help find a solution to their coffee surpluses. They believed that a new coffee product that was soluble in hot water, yet retained its flavour, would help stimulate World coffee sales. After seven years of research and frequent tasting, scientist Max Mortgenthaler finally achieved the desired results and, on 1st April 1938, Nescafé was launched, first in Switzerland and then later in Britain.

Some claim that it was the introduction of commercial television in 1956 that acted as a catalyst to the success of instant coffee in Britain. The commercial breaks were too short a time in which to brew a cup of tea, but time enough for an instant coffee. There is probably some truth to this claim as, by the 1960s, the majority of the tea industry started producing tea bags, an invention by Thomas Sullivan over half a century earlier (1904). Tea bags were seen as more convenient, simpler and quicker to use then traditional loose leaf tea and so could compete against instant coffee.

The coffee industry soon realised the association between commercial breaks and coffee drinking and started investing heavily in television advertising. Probably the most famous series of coffee advertisements were made for Nescafé Gold Blend. First aired in 1987, these advertisements focused on the sexual chemistry between a couple, played by Anthony Head and Sharon Maughan, acted out in a mini soap opera. The advertisements gripped the whole nation, featuring as frequently as Eastenders or Coronation Street as topics of conversation. This original series of advertisements ran for ten years, increasing sales of Gold Blend by 40% in the first five years (there were two further, less successful, sets of advertisements with different actors). Such was the profile of these advertisements, that they even featured as a news article on the ‘News at Ten’.

With the coffee industry focused on price rather then quality, it was little wonder that coffee sales became stagnant. Coffee drinking was now more about a caffeine fix rather then about savouring the taste, to be drunk in a break from work, rather then to be enjoyed over conversation or while reading the newspaper. Unsurprisingly the younger generations born in the 70s and 80s turned their back on bitter coffee, preferring sugary soft drinks such as Coca Cola and Pepsi for their caffeine kicks.